Traver IDC | everything electrical

In Business Since 1938
1.800.TE.MOTOR
24 hours a day

faqs

Motor Repair

What is the turnaround time for a motor repair at Traver IDC?
At one of our past Lean Kaizen events, the team decided to institute a Green, Yellow, Red approach to lead time to provide our customers with a definite expectation regarding turnaround time. When the motor is dropped off, each customer is asked whether they would like Green (standard), Yellow (rush) or Red (rush, overtime authorized) delivery. There is a $75.00 premium for Yellow or Red delivery. Yellow motors go to the head of the line (ahead of all the green motors) and Red motors go to the head of the line and are worked on the same day they are dropped off. Shop loading; motor frame size; and level of service (Green, Yellow or Red) determine the turnaround time. The various possibilities are posted daily on a prominent board in the customer service area. Currently, the range of turnaround time based on the above choices varies from 1 day to 7 days.

Engineering

Temperature - How do you convert a Fahrenheit temperature value to the Centigrade (Celsius) value?

You subtract 32 degrees from the fahrenheit value. Then you divide by 9. Finally, you multiply by 5.

Example: If temperature is 68 degrees fahrenheit, subtracting 32 leaves 36. Dividing 36 by 9 equals 4. Finally, multiplying 4 by 5 equals 20. So the answer is 20 degrees centigrade.  

Engineering

Temperature - How do you convert a Centrigrade (Celsius) temperature value to the equivalent Fahrenheit value?

First you divide the Centigrade (celsius) value by 5. Then, you multiply this new value by 9. Finally, you add 32 degrees to this latest value.

Example: If the Centrigrade value is 25 degrees, dividing by 5 leaves 5. Then, multiplying 5 by 9 equals 45. Finally adding 32 to 45 leaves 77 degrees Fahrenheit. 

Contracting

Feeder Raceways - What is the pending change to the 2011 NEC regarding feeder raceways entering buildings?
As noted in the NEC Committee Report on Proposals, 2010 Annual Revision Cycle, Code-Making Panel 4 has voted to accept a Code change submitted by Joel A. Rencsok of Scottsdale, Ariz. (Log #307 NEC-P04). The recommendation calls for adding a new section to Art. 225, which states:

"Raceway Seal. Where a feeder raceway enters a building or structure from an underground distribution system, it shall be sealed in accordance with 300.5(G). Spare or unused raceways shall also be sealed. Sealants shall be identified for use with the cable insulation, shield or other components."

As noted in the substantiation summary, feeders entering buildings or other structures are no different than services. The requirements should be the same as noted in 230.8.

Energy Conservation

CFLs - How much money can you save by replacing your 100 watt incandescent light bulbs with 25 watt CFLs?

You can save $130.00 per year in electricity and another $40.00 in maintenance savings by changing out (1) light bulb. Based on an initial cost of $3.00 (the cost of these bulbs here at Traver IDC), the payback is an unbelievable 7 DAYS!!! That's right, you will recoup the cost of the new light bulb in only 1 WEEK!!!

So, how do we calculate this.

ENERGY SAVINGS:

KW saved = (100 watts - 25 watts)/1000 = .075 kw

KWH saved = .075 kw x 24 hours x 365 days = 657 kwh

Total Energy Savings = 657 kwh x $.20/kwh = $131.40/year (apx $130.00/year)

MAINTENANCE SAVINGS:

Existing Lamp Life = 1000 hours

# of Lamps Required per year = 8760 hours/year / 1000 hours/lamp = 8 lamps

Material cost = 8 lamps x $1.00/lamp = $8.00

Labor Cost = 5 minutes/lamp x 8 lamps / 60 minutes/hour x $60.00/hour = $40.00

Total cost = $8.00 + $40.00 = $48.00

Proposed Lamp Life = 10,000 hours

# of Lamps Required per year = 8760 hours/year / 10,000 hours/lamp = 1 lamp

Material cost = 1 lamp x $3.00/lamp = $3.00

Labor Cost = 5 minutes/lamp x 1 lamps / 60 minutes/hour x $60.00/hour = $5.00

Total cost = $3.00 + $5.00 = $8.00

Total Maintenance Savings = $48.00 - $8.00 = $40.00/year

TOTAL SAVINGS = $170.00/YEAR

CLASS DISMISSED, NOW GET DOWN TO TRAVER IDC TODAY AND BUY A BOATLOAD OF 25 WATT CFLs!!!

Supply

Magnetic Starters - What are the HP ratings of the various full voltage Nema magnetic starters - Sizes 00 - 6?

At 200 Volts: Size 00 - 1-1/2HP; Size 0 - 3HP; Size 1 - 7-1/2HP; Size 2 - 10HP; Size 3 - 25HP; Size 4 - 40HP; Size 5 - 75HP; Size 6 - 150HP.

At 230 Volts: Size 00 - 1-1/2HP; Size 0 - 3HP; Size 1 - 7-1/2HP; Size 2 - 15HP; Size 3 - 30HP; Size 4 - 50HP; Size 5 - 100HP; Size 6 -200HP.

At 460/575 Volts: Size 00 - 2HP; Size 0 - 5HP; Size 1 - 10HP; Size 2 - 25HP; Size 3 - 50HP; Size 4 - 100HP; Size 5 - 200HP; Size 6 - 400HP.

Contracting

What are the derating factors for conductors in a conduit?

For 4-6 conductors - 80%.

For 7-9 conductors - 70%.

For 10-20 conductors - 50%.

For 21-30 conductors - 45%.

For 31-40 conductors - 40%.

For 41 & above - 35%.

Motor Repair

What is a constant torque motor?

A constant torque motor is a motor for which the rated horsepower varies in direct ratio the the synchronous speeds.  The output torque is the same at all speeds.

Motor Repair

What is a rotor?
The rotating element of any motor or generator.

Engineering

What is power factor?
The ratio of watts to volt-amperes of an AC electric circuit.

Engineering

What is the polarity of the interpole in a generator?
For a generator, the polarity of the interpole is the same as that of the main pole following it in the direction of rotation.

Engineering

What is the polarity of the interpole in a motor?
For a motor, the polarity of the interpole is the same as that of the main pole preceding it in the direction of rotation.

Motor Repair

What is a stator?
The stationary part of a rotating electric machine.  Commonly used to describe the stationary part of an AC machine that contains the primary windings.

Motor Repair

What is a motor?
A rotating machine that converts electrical power into mechanical power. The electrical power can be either alternating current or direct current.

Engineering

What is an alternator?
A synchronous machine used to convert mechanical power into alternating current electrical power.

Traver IDC
151-165 Homer St., Waterbury, CT 06704
t 203.753.5103 | f 203.573.9352

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